Book of the Day Posted Mar 21, 2019

Book of the Day > Vitamin T: Threads and Textiles in Contemporary Art

Book of the Day > Vitamin T: Threads and Textiles in Contemporary Art. Published by Phaidon. "A global survey of more than 100 artists, chosen by art-world professionals for their work with threads, stitching, and textiles. Celebrating tapestry, embroidery, stitching, textiles, knitting, and knotting as used by visual artists worldwide, Vitamin T is the latest in the celebrated series in which leading curators, critics, and art professionals nominate living artists for inclusion. As boundaries between art and craft have blurred, artists have increasingly embraced these materials and methods, with the resulting works being coveted by collectors and exhibited in museums worldwide. Vitamin T is a vibrant and incredibly timely survey – the first of its kind."

 
Book of the Day Posted Mar 20, 2019

Book of the Day > Ethan James Green: Young New York

Book of the Day > Ethan James Green: Young New York. Published by Aperture. "Young New York, Ethan James Green’s first monograph, presents a selection of striking portraits of New York’s millennial scene-makers, a gloriously diverse cast of models, artists, nightlife icons, queer youth, and gender binary–flouting muses of the fashion world and beyond. Under the mentorship of the late David Armstrong, Green developed a sensitive and confident style and an intense connection with his subjects; his luminous black-and-white portraits, many taken in Corlears Hook Park on the Lower East Side, bring to mind Diane Arbus’s midcentury studies of gender nonconformists. Although he often shoots on commission for fashion brands and magazines, for Young New York, Green photographed his close friends and community for more than three years, and his humanist approach transcends the trends of the moment. Young New York promises to announce a bright young talent who is redefining beauty and identity for a new generation. In the words of the model and actress Hari Nef, one of Green’s frequent subjects, 'In Ethan’s world, the kids who inspire him ought to be (and are) the subjects of his work. Ethan is an artist among so-called image makers.'”
Book of the Day Posted Mar 14, 2019

Book of the Day > Dorothy Iannone: A Cookbook

 
Book of the Day > Dorothy Iannone: A Cookbook. Published by JRP Ringier. "Since the 1960s, Dorothy Iannone (born 1933) has aimed at representing ecstatic love, 'the union of gender, feeling and pleasure.' Today her oeuvre, encompassing paintings, drawings, collages, videos, sculptures, objects and artist’s books, is widely recognized as one of the most provocative and fruitful bodies of work in recent decades for its liberalization of female sexuality, and political and feminist issues. Created in 1969, when she was living with Swiss artist Dieter Roth, the Cookbook is a perfect example of how Iannone mixes daily life, creativity and thought, culminating in her vision of cooking as an outlet for both eroticism and introspection. A real book of recipes full of visual delights, the Cookbook contains densely decorated pages with patterned designs, packed text and vibrant colors. Personal sentences are interspersed among the lists of ingredients, revealing the exultations and tribulations of her life between the lines of recipes. Filled with wit, wordplay and idiosyncratic thoughts—'At least one can turn pain to color' accompanies the recipe for gazpacho; “Dorothy’s spirit is like this: green and yellow,” is written next to the ingredients for lentil soup—the Cookbook constitutes a self-portrait of the artist as a cook and a lover. This publication is a facsimile of the 1969 original , now published with a dust jacket specially designed by the artist."
 
Book of the Day Posted Mar 12, 2019

Book of the Day > Soldier Studies: Cross Dressing in der Wehrmacht

 

Book of the Day > Soldier Studies: Cross-Dressing in der Wehrmacht. Published by Hatje Cantz. "Why did so many German soldiers dress up as women during World War II? The artist and collector Martin Dammann has studied war photography, the impact of images, and how history is written. During his research, he came across many amateur photographs of soldiers in the German army who dressed as women—scenes that directly contradicted Nazi ideology. Dammann’s discoveries are now being presented for discussion in his critical book, which features pictures that provide surprising insights into the longings and everyday lives of German soldiers in World War II: from playful scenes of young recruits clowning around, to improvised disguises among close friends at the front, to carefully prepared performances in Allied POW camps. Essays by Martin Dammann and the renowned sociologist and author Harald Welzer examine the multiple facets of the pictures."
 
Book of the Day Posted Mar 07, 2019

Book of the Day > Carolee Schneeman: Carolee's Issue 02

In Memory of Carolee Schneeman (1939 - 2019).

 

Book of the Day > Carolee Schneeman: Carolee's Issue 02. Published by The Artist's Institute and Koenig Books. "Carolee’s is the second issue of The Magazine of the Artist’s Institute, the publication which takes each season of the Artist’s Institute as a point of departure for new criticism, journalism, fiction, interviews and artist projects, developed around the work of a single artist. Dedicated to Carolee Schneemann (born 1939), this issue features a previously unpublished archive of images from Schneemann’s studio that documents half a century of morphological connections between her work and other visual material, including art, advertising and popular culture. Published following the Artist’s Institute’s season of exhibitions and programming examining Schneemann’s expanded conception of the body as material, Carolee’s includes a new long-form profile of Schneemann by writer Maggie Nelson that considers the artist’s relationship to the history of her reception and Schneemann’s significant influence on subsequent generations of feminists."

Book of the Day Posted Mar 03, 2019

Book of the Day > Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future

Book of the Day > Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future. Published by Guggenheim Museum Publications in conjunction with the exhibit at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. "When Swedish artist Hilma af Klint died in 1944 at the age of 81, she left behind more than 1,000 paintings and works on paper that she had kept largely private during her lifetime. Believing the world was not yet ready for her art, she stipulated that it should remain unseen for another twenty years. But only in recent decades has the public had a chance to reckon with af Klint's radically abstract painting practice—one which predates the work of Vasily Kandinsky and other artists widely considered trailblazers of modernist abstraction. Her boldly colorful works, many of them large-scale, reflect an ambitious, spiritually informed attempt to chart an invisible, totalizing world order through a synthesis of natural and geometric forms, textual elements, and esoteric symbolism. Accompanying the first major survey exhibition of the artist's work in the United States, Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future represents her groundbreaking painting series while expanding recent scholarship to present the fullest picture yet of her life and art. Essays explore the social, intellectual, and artistic context of af Klint's 1906 break with figuration and her subsequent development, placing her in the context of Swedish modernism and folk art traditions, contemporary scientific discoveries, and spiritualist and occult movements. A roundtable discussion among contemporary artists, scholars, and curators considers af Klint's sources and relevance to art in the 21st century. The volume also delves into her unrealized plans for a spiral-shaped temple in which to display her art—a wish that finds a fortuitous answer in the Guggenheim Museum's rotunda, the site of the exhibition." 
 
Book of the Day Posted Feb 28, 2019

Book of the Day > Creating Their Own Image: The History of African-American Women Artists

Book of the Day > Creating Their Own Image: The History of African-American Women Artists. Published by Oxford University Press. "Creating Their Own Image marks the first comprehensive history of African-American women artists, from slavery to the present day. Using an analysis of stereotypes of Africans and African-Americans in western art and culture as a springboard, Lisa E. Farrington here richly details hundreds of important works--many of which deliberately challenge these same identity myths, of the carnal Jezebel, the asexual Mammy, the imperious Matriarch--in crafting a portrait of artistic creativity unprecedented in its scope and ambition. In these lavishly illustrated pages, some of which feature images never before published, we learn of the efforts of Elizabeth Keckley, fashion designer to Mary Todd Lincoln; the acclaimed sculptor Edmonia Lewis, internationally renowned for her neoclassical works in marble; and the artist Nancy Elizabeth Prophet and her innovative teaching techniques. We meet Laura Wheeler Waring who portrayed women of color as members of a socially elite class in stark contrast to the prevalent images of compliant maids, impoverished malcontents, and exotics "others" that proliferated in the inter-war period. We read of the painter Barbara Jones-Hogu's collaboration on the famed Wall of Respect, even as we view a rare photograph of Hogu in the process of painting the mural. Farrington expertly guides us through the fertile period of the Harlem Renaissance and the "New Negro Movement," which produced an entirely new crop of artists who consciously imbued their work with a social and political agenda, and through the tumultuous, explosive years of the civil rights movement. Drawing on revealing interviews with numerous contemporary artists, such as Betye Saar, Faith Ringgold, Nanette Carter, Camille Billops, Xenobia Bailey, and many others, the second half of Creating Their Own Image probes more recent stylistic developments, such as abstraction, conceptualism, and post-modernism, never losing sight of the struggles and challenges that have consistently influenced this body of work. Weaving together an expansive collection of artists, styles, and periods, Farrington argues that for centuries African-American women artists have created an alternative vision of how women of color can, are, and might be represented in American culture. From utilitarian objects such as quilts and baskets to a wide array of fine arts, Creating Their Own Imageserves up compelling evidence of the fundamental human need to convey one's life, one's emotions, one's experiences, on a canvas of one's own making."
Book of the Day Posted Feb 24, 2019

Book of the Day > Adam Pendleton: Black Dada Reader

Book of the Day > Adam Pendleton: Black Dada Reader. Published by Koenig Books. "Now available in paperback, Black Dada Reader is a collection of texts and documents that elucidates 'Black Dada,' a term that acclaimed New York–based artist Adam Pendleton (born 1984) uses to define his artistic output. The Reader brings a diverse range of cultural figures into a shared conceptual space, including Hugo Ball, W.E.B. Du Bois, Stokely Carmichael, LeRoi Jones, Sun Ra, Adrian Piper, Joan Retallack, Harryette Mullen, Ron Silliman and Gertrude Stein, as well as artists from different generations such as Ad Reinhardt, Joan Jonas, William Pope.L, Thomas Hirschhorn and Stan Douglas. It also includes essays on the concept of Black Dada and its historical implications from curators and critics, including Adrienne Edwards (Walker Arts Center/Performa), Laura Hoptman (MoMA), Tom McDonough (Binghamton), Jenny Schlenzka (PS122) and Susan Thompson (Guggenheim)."
Book of the Day Posted Feb 23, 2019

Book of the Day > I Too Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100

Book of the Day > I Too Sing America: The Harlem Renaissance at 100. Published by Rizzoli. "One hundred years after the Harlem Renaissance emerged as a creative force at the close of World War I, I Too Sing America offers a major survey on the visual art and material culture of the groundbreaking movement. It illuminates multiple facets of the era--the lives of its people, the art, the literature, the music, and the social history--through paintings, prints, photography, sculpture, and contemporary documents and ephemera. The lushly illustrated chronicle includes work by cherished artists such as Romare Bearden, Allan Rohan Crite, Palmer Hayden, William Johnson, Jacob Lawrence, Archibald Motley, and James Van Der Zee. The project is the culmination of decades of reflection, research, and scholarship by Wil Haygood, acclaimed biographer and preeminent historian on Harlem and its cultural roots. In thematic chapters, the author captures the range and breadth of the Harlem Reniassance, a sweeping movement which saw an astonishing array of black writers and artists and musicians gather over a period of a few intense years, expanding far beyond its roots in Harlem to unleashing a myriad of talents upon the nation. The book is published in conjunction with a major exhibition at the Columbus Museum of Art."
Book of the Day Posted Feb 21, 2019

Book of the Day > Carrie Mae Weems: Strategies of Engagement

Carrie Mae Weems: Strategies of Engagement. Published in conjunction with an exhibit at the McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College. "Few American artists today are creating work as striking and politically charged as Carrie Mae Weems. Carrie Mae Weems: Strategies of Engagement explores a unique body of aesthetically powerful work that is particularly relevant in the context of current debates about social justice. In addition to acclaimed series by Weems dealing with historical archives, this catalogue for an exhibition at the McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College also features new photographs that address police violence. Strategies of Engagement highlights Weems’s relationship with her viewers, which is at once pedagogical, confrontational, and collaborative, thus encouraging ongoing debates about power and resistance, history and identity. Intellectually and ethically challenging, the works in Strategies of Engagement are also imbued with melancholy seriousness, playful wit, and unexpected flashes of hope, grace, and beauty. Essays by a diverse collection of scholars analyze Weems’s use of performance and masquerade to reanimate lost histories and others focus on her transformative interventions in documentary photography and archives. The volume is rounded out by a panel discussion with Weems about the relationship between the arts and social change."
more